Climate Change

Tom Finn and Sam Kimball, April 22, 2014

Like a spear thrusting into the Gulf of Mexico’s gut, the Isle de Jean Charles is turbulent with ruinous daily oil and gas accidents, rising sea levels, and tropical storms. Homes on the Isle de Jean Charles perch on delicate wooden stilts thirteen feet high, their paint peeling in the sun. A solitary road snakes down the spine of the shrinking island. Stained American flags billow slowly in the Gulf breeze, affixed to porches where one can catch the nasal tones of plaid-clad men bantering in Cajun French.

Sandra Lindberg, July 11, 2019

 

“Not everyone is coming to the future,

Not everyone is learning from the past.”

                        Madonna & Quavo

Max Ajl, Uneven Earth, June 15, 2019
Drone meets cow - Mauricio Lima  (CC BY 2.0)

On the future of farming, socialist science, and utopia

Debates about the Green New Deal—Ocasio-Cortez’s version and occasionally radical varieties such as that of the US Green Party—have incited much discussion about paths to utopia. Central to these conversations is the labour question: who will do the work of making the world, and how will that work be apportioned? And how much will the US Way of Life © have to change?

Editors, SCNCC, June 3, 2019
Juliana Plaintiffs Group Picture

On Tuesday, June 4, at 2 p.m. Pacific Time, three judges of the Ninth Circuit will hear arguments by the Trump Administration seeking to stop the Juliana v. United States lawsuit brought by a group of young people claiming a constitutional right to "a climate system capable of sustaining human life" and asserting that the United States government is violating that right.

Joe Maniscalo, Labor Press, May 13, 2019
Hurricane Maria wreckage in Puerto Rcio

New York,, NY – Shut. It. Down. Amalgamated Transit Union VP Bruce Hamilton, this weekend, urged U.S. trade unionists to “learn from our past” and start building towards a general strike in a last ditch effort to avert climate disaster. 

“What we need to understand is that climate struggle is class struggle,” Hamilton told the NY Labor History Association’s Annual Spring Conference at NYU on Saturday. “Workers really do want to engage in radical action with a clear chance of making their lives better.”

Ashley Dawson, In These Times, April 15, 2019
An estimated 40,000 people rallied March 10 at the Climate March in Amsterdam, pushing the Dutch government to move faster on climate action. Twenty-six percent of the Netherlands sits below sea level. (Photo by Paulo Amorim/Nurphoto via Getty Images)

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s landmark October 2018 report declared that preventing runaway global warming will require “far-reaching transitions in energy, land … and industrial systems” for which there is “no documented historic precedent.” Oxford University climate scientist and report author Myles Allen explained, “It’s telling us we need to … turn the world economy on a dime.”

Tobita Chow, In These Times, April 15, 2019
(Sabine Scheckel/Getty Images)

This pieces is a response to “We Can't Beat Climate Change Under Capitalism. Socialism Is the Only Way.​”

Ashley is correct that addressing the climate crisis requires a radical transformation of the economic system, including more state-led planning. However, insisting that we must immediately end economic growth, let alone capitalism, is a political dead end. Fortunately, a green transformation can coincide with sustainable, egalitarian growth.

Thea N. Riofrancos, In These Times, April 15, 2019
(Photo by Gabriele Holtermann Gorden/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

This piece is a response to “We Don’t Have Time to End Capitalism—But Growth Can Still Be Green.​

While the question of whether we should address capitalism first or climate change first is often posed in sequential terms, it is a false choice—though a compelling one.

Nato Green, In These Times, April 5, 2019
Teachers at The Accelerated Schools, a community of public charter schools in South Los Angeles picket outside the school on second day of the Los Angeles school teachers strike on January 15, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.

Union contract negotiations include mandatory and permissive subjects of bargaining. Employers are required by law to negotiate over mandatory subjects—wages, benefits and working conditions. Permissive subjects, such as decisions about which public services will be provided and how, have historically been the purview of management. We only negotiate over how managerial decisions affect members’ jobs. Employers may voluntarily agree to negotiate permissive subjects, but unions can’t legally strike over them.

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